Tag Archives: Western Martial Arts

Still Here

Yup, still here.

I have been meaning to use this blog again for quite some time. However, I find it really uninteresting to write about the kind of day-to-day things that I can’t imagine anyone being interested in reading. I starting this site to talk about things pertaining to my interests and projects, and I’m still fighting against ever making it too personal or mundane.

I do however have several projects on the go right now, so I shall explain those;

First of all the Steampunk self-defence manual is not dead. As per its final wishes, it was rushed to our privatized cryogenics facility to be put on ice until the time comes for it to be revived and resuscitated by future technology. Well, that time has (almost) arrived.

I was talking to a few of the folks over at Academie Duello and the subject of the steampunk manual came up. I had somewhat forgotten about  the idea, locked away as it was in its icy tomb, but the chats prompted me to think about it again.  Hearing some of the ideas, suggestions and encouragements I received when I showed them some of the work I had already done, I began to rethink the concept a little. I now have what I believe to be an improved plan for the book, and a much more accessible scheme for completing it.

So why, you may ask, have I not started work on the photo shoots needed to publish the book? Laziness! Pure, undiluted laziness. Photo shoots require people-planing and group organizing, and I will opt for solo writing work every time. I am going to begin gathering people for the photo though, just not quite yet. For one, I’m waiting for the weather to level out enough to make the picture taking easier to plan.

The second project I have going is a screenplay. This is more straightforward, as I am just doing the age-old traditional lack of creativity and adapting a samurai movie into a western. I will not say which Japanese film I’m adapting because IT’S MINE, GET YOUR OWN! I will say that writing western dialogue is really, really fun. I think my bad-ass lady gun/knife fighter protagonist is one of the most fun characters I’ve come up with in terms of enjoying writing about them.

There is a second screenplay in the works as well. Many a year ago, Randy Packer and I penned a script for a period drama about old English martial arts. The concept was great, but the story itself never really came out as well as we had hoped. Now, more than half a decade later, we started thinking about it again. We begun the preliminary planning for writing the idea totally from scratch again, though we both seem to have gone off on our individual ideas for the time being. Once I’m finished with my western script, however, I will definitely push to renew our collaboration on the fencing story.

But what about martial arts?

That subject has been causing me much grief lately. I never do manage to be satisfied by working in just one field. If I’m writing a lot, even if I’m working out on my own all the time, I still feel like I’m wasting away as a martial artist.

And that thought does kill me a little.

As far as I know, the whole Scatha Combat Guild plan is still dead. I would like to make the argument that it is also in cryogenic suspension until the world is ready for it, but I’m not sure that would be true. There is no space, and no attempt to run classes or practices. That, as far as martial arts schools go, is pretty succinctly dead.

Not that I wouldn’t love to do that again, I miss it just about every day. However, as I stand right now I have no faith in myself to try and start from nothing for what would essentially be the third time.

I have come to accept the fact that I simply do not inspire people to want to follow me. It’s hard to define, but no matter how hard I try I never achieve the kind of charisma that makes people want to learn what I know. Over the years the only way I seem to be able to earn people’s respect is by being a hard-ass, but then I just end up making students dislike me.

Maybe in another ten years I’ll figure it out, but for now I just have to come to terms with the fact that I’m not head-instructor material.

Another little insecurity I have as to my qualifications is the fact that I never really trained in a art with a recognized ranking system. Now, personally I don’t think the standard ‘belt’ system of most arts is actually a good way to rank students. Nonetheless, whenever I mention that I used to teach martial arts one of the first questions I get is something along the lines of “Do you have a black belt”. This of course, gets the rather awkward answer of trying to explain how a progressive style works and how I have no real title to explain my experience level.

That can be a little annoying.

In the meantime I will probably look into getting back into boxing training or some such in order to make sure I stay in practice. I was sparring at Duello on the odd Friday (though I took a month off from that), but I do often miss the visceral satisfaction of just punching things.

Speaking of fencing though, there is another tournament at Duello coming up that I think I can register to fight in. The question is; do I want to? I competed in a small one at the end of April, and I found it rather anti-climactic how little time I actually spent fighting. Even when I won, I felt it happened so quickly that I didn’t really enjoy it. I like to feel like I’ve really worked for my victories, which is why I usually chose to fight at least ten passes with someone if I can. However, my first fight probably totaled about fifteen seconds worth of actual engagement and my second fight wasn’t all that much longer.

Rapier tournaments were never really something I liked. I love fighting for the love of fighting, and I love fighting to win against another opponent – but I like it to be more of a true test of skill and training, and a few seconds at a time doesn’t seem to qualify for that.  I think bear-pit style tournaments were the only ones I really enjoyed.

So, in conclusion;

I’m getting back into writing, I’m staying in very good shape and I really would like to be able to teach the 5×5 system again because I thought it was absolute genius on our part and I loved watching students learn that way.

End transmission.


A Winter in Review

Well, hullo then.

I haven’t used this blog in some time – a few months in fact. There are several reasons for that, though most of them are feeble as excuses. The first and most poignant was NANOWRIMO. For those who are not aware, the acronym in question is a national novel writing competition. The goal is to write a fifty thousand word book within the month of November. Such a task required the majority of my attention. Afterwords, well, followed much less productivity than I would have liked.

And so, a winter in review;

As I mentioned, November began with my second attempt at a thirty day novel. I managed to pull a basic story idea involving a historical/fantasy plot that was based around the court intrigues of Elizabethan England. (Why I am consistently foolish enough to start deadline projects with ridiculously complicated stories I shall never know.) On the whole, the novel writing frenzy began with the wind at my back and my sails propelling me forward with great haste. Contrarily, it ended with a slow sinking into the black waters of northern seas after being viciously and suddenly attacked by Nordic pirates.

I barely made it halfway, though I did churn out some decent chapters here and there. (At the end of my last attempt, two years ago, I at least managed to make it to forty-thousand words) Sadly, I allowed three very long shifts at work exhaust me. Never managing to catch up on those sad, couple-hundred-word-count days, my novel petered out and was no more.

At first, I was all afire to start another writing project – one that was less hurried. Unfortunately, I am one of those people who works best under a little pressure. So my daily writing habits slowly declined into, well, no writing habits. In fact, I have fallen into a horrific tendency of doing absolutely nothing with the first three hours of my day. For this I feel no end of shame.

On the plus side, I did spend that uncreative time altering my diet and exercise routines. Rather I should say; maintaining the alterations I made at the end of the summer. Currently I weigh less than I ever have in my adult life, and have kept a sufficient amount of my muscle mass in doing so. In fact, I am very nearly able to say that I have actually achieved the more vain aspects of my fitness goals. That is, however, all I shall say about that. After all, there is nothing more boring than listening to someone talk about their own weight loss. I suppose, as un-stoic as it is, personal improvement seems more relevant when it is made known to others.

How insecure we all are.

As to the subject of martial arts, that tale runs along similar lines. While I find the time every few weeks to visit the open fight nights at Academie Duello, I have no practice of my own anymore. The Friday fencing bouts keep me adept and satisfy my cravings to stab at people, but I do miss both instructing and learning the material to which I am most inclined. Bartitsu, in particular, is something I would love to be able to work on again. And sabre.

(Incidentally, there was also that whole Steampunk Self-Defence Manual plan. That book, by the way, was actually completed as far as the text is concerned, and still sits waiting on my computer. However, the disbandment of SCG’s regular classes left me without anyone to help demonstrate the techniques in the photos. And so…)

Perhaps, once the weather becomes more clement, I will try and re-start an outdoor practice of one of these things. If I really put effort in I might be able to secure one student. Maybe two. The real issue is figuring out what I actually want to do with martial arts. What focus do I want to take? I have no clue really. It’s been nearly a decade since I first started training, and all my plans to make a living out of it have become somewhat prone to failure.

Yet I refuse to be maudlin. I still have almost ten years of experience, some of which is in branches of fighting very few people are familiar with. That is certainly nothing to sneeze at. I just need a plan. I’ve always been able to concoct schemes within a set of parameters, but when it comes to plotting out the rest of my own life… That, I must admit, has me at a loss more often than not.

The threat of my thirtieth birthday looms ahead like an ominous sunrise of full adulthood. I’d be lying if I said that fact didn’t terrify me almost as much as the notion of… dancing. OK, that was a bit maudlin.

And on that note, I need to go and try and find a new job now.

Picture Perfect

In working with Western Martial arts there is no denying that half of the interpretations of the old manuals come from studying the plates and illustrations. (The other half being deciphering the arcane grammar…) I feel that there is something that many people overlook in regards to the pictures and their co-relation to the attached description – they are hand drawn. That means that the artist had to sketch the subject while the fencer did his best to hold still. This is why it is important to ‘filter’, as it were, the images through the descriptions in the text. The person drawing the plate is, unless I am mistaken, rarely a fencing master himself. So while the image may be a static and technically correct demonstration of a technique, it is most probably not how the manoeuvre would look when executed during combat. One has to imagine the moment AFTER the plate. The fencer would not pause as he finished his attack, he would recover immediately to guard without any pause.

Take modern boxing as an example. If I were to take still photos of a champion boxer demonstrating a perfect jab and cross then I would indeed have an illustration of a perfectly sound technique.  However, the dynamic and athletic way in which the fighter transitions between those positions cannot be captured in posed illustrations. The pictures of the techniques would come nowhere near doing justice to the graceful way the person actually moved when fighting freely.

Therefore it seems like folly to try and PERFECTLY replicate the plates in renaissance fencing manuals, since they are intended as a scientific demonstration of artful techniques as opposed to a captured moment of elegant combat. You have to take into account that the illustration displays someone who is doing their best to hold still, as opposed to someone who is actually moving quickly and lightly on their feet. For instance, I have sometimes seen interpretations of such masters as Marozzo (depicted above) that seem to step statically from one guard to the other, rather that throwing cuts that facilitate a smooth transition between guards. It is quite possible to throw two dynamic cuts that pass perfectly through four guards without pausing in between each motion. When I look at the illustrations of Marozzo I notice his wide stance, and that his body weight is held over the lead leg. To me, that bespeaks of someone who is moving quickly and prepared to angle and sidestep without having to pause and shift his balance. Fencing is like all martial arts; when it is done at full speed it should be dynamic, fast and efficient. It should be a constant flow as opposed to the steps of a clockwork soldier.

So by all means, study the academic side of these historic fighting styles. However, do remember in your studies that they ARE fighting styles. Like any skill; the academic side isn’t everything, you need experience making it actually work in your own way.